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Through thousands of years, hundreds of different civilization with some diametrical colors, sound, rhythm has been composed in this area. They are blended, they get various shapes, but if you look and listen intimately you can see the signs of all that great civilizations absolute in this picture. Turkish dance is one of the most lively and colorful themes of this picture.
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Turkish Dances, Anatolian Dances, Dance in Istanbul, Dance in Turkey, Culture of Dance in Istanbul, Some of the Anatolian Dances, Karşılama, hora and salma are the names of the dances which are peculiar to Trakya region, European part of Turkey and also popular in Balkans. Trakya dances are performed with the accompany of two drums and two pipes. Zigoş, one of the most famous dances, is usually danced by six couples standing in two rows. They advanced towards and recede from each other with their backs slightly bent. They begin slowly and softly, the movement becomes violent step by step, to be followed later by crouching movements. There are also sideways steps and embracing gestures. Zeybek is one of the most well known dances of Turkey,which is found specifically on the Aerean Coast as a characteristic of Western Turkey. It is danced by just one dancer or by several. However even when it is performed by several people, it keeps its solo character as a result of the heroic style of the dance. All dancers follow the movements of others but at the same time they always test the ground and tune their body to the rhythm. Their other leg is in half bent position. They hold their arms outstretched with elbows as high as the shoulders and snap their fingers. Every zeybek is preceded by a slow, introductory part in which the dancer tries leisurely walking steps. This part looks as if the dancers are testing the ground and tuning their bodies to the rhythm. They first walk with the arms at the side, then at shoulder level. It is a dance of solemn, heroic style. The dancers, also called zaybek or efe, wear short embroidered trousers which permit them to kneel. Zeybek can be found in other regiond of Turkey in different styles, sometimes performed with spoons for example. Bengi is also the dance of this region. It is a group dance, representing unity and solidarity like zeybek. Halay is the most widespread dance all around Anatolia. Nearly every village in most parts of Central Anatolia, Eastern Anatolia and the South has its own halay with its own special tune. Dancers usually place themselves in a line or in a semi circle, holding each other’s hands or shoulders. One dancer acts as their leader. He regulates the steps and directs the figures and sometimes he breaks away from the line and executes solo dances facing the line. There are halays danced by men and women together; however there are halays which are performed by just men or women and they change in manner, style, and figures. Horon is the name of a group of dances performed in Northern Turkey on the Black Sea Coast. These dances are characterised by alert, tense, shivering movements, the trembling of the entire body from head to foot, or sudden sharp kneeling and springing up with a rebound. The inhabitants of this area are mostly fishermen or men connected with the sea, so not doubt a rough sea shapes their movements and rhythms. Kaşık Oyunu (Spoon Dance) is the most popular dance in Central Anatolia. Dancers carry in each hand, a pair of varnished wooden spoons, one of which is inserted between thumb and forefinger and the other between the middle and rng finger- in this position they are clicked like castanets. The dancer treads with very small steps in a confined space while undulating the lower part of the body. Another wellknown spoon dance is from Bolu. The dancers start by saluting the onlookers. This salute consists of crouching, touching their spoonsfirst on the ground then on their chins and then on their foreheads. Then the dancers face eacch other in pairs, they approach, recede, kneel and turn. Bar can be taken as the most remarkable group of dance with about forty variations. They are usually chain dances but there are also several bar for two dancers. The most popular chain variety are the twelve different bar from Erzurum. There are usually five dancers, but there could be many more. A chain bar demands a leader, who stands at the right of the chain. Semah is a quasi-religious social dance of villages belong to nomadic tribes of a sect called Alevite. They were performed in secret indoor meetings called cem before. This dancing, in spite of its spirituel awareness and sacred air usually takes a worldly turn. No doubt these mixed dances have some reference to the suppresion and sublimation of desires. Dancers never hold hands but they face each other and cross them across their chests. The women’s arm movements are more restrained than the men’s, for they never raise their arms higher than their shoulders. They move by pointing the toes with smallfoot movements. There is a sacred place in the hall called çeragtahı where candles are burnt. When a dancer passes this place, he must not turn his back on it, he must face it with his hands crossed on his chest and bow his head. Semahs usually are usually performed in quadrille formation, the dancers facing each other in rows. The dancers shuffle back and forth, breaking through each other counter formation. Semahs usually consist of at least two parts: ağırlama, a slow movement in which men and women mirror each other’s hand and arm movements, and yeldirme, a quick movement in which whirling is a striking feature. There are also hand clappings. Many semahs bear a close resemblance to the folk dances of the same region which is Central and Eastern Asia. Caucassian dances group is one of the most spectacular dances of Anatolia. As many ethnic group, Caucasian people live and keep their original culture in harmony with all Anatolia. They imitate the natural life in their homeland, tell their stories, love, legends, wars and daily life with their dance with the accompany of their traditional musical instruments named as şık'epşıne(stringed), pondur(accordion-like), doli(percussive), kamalıpşıne(wind). Men are mostly proud and heroic, women are mostly delicate and laydlike. They dance as a group, in couples or solo, As he offers you a seat, a tea, a warm and friendly welcome, Nurdoğan Şengüler turns his gaze from the walls of his studio to the dome of Hagia Sophia, to the Sea of Marmara.Light pours into the room, dances across the walls and reveals a large-framed picture of Hagia Sophia under the snow. Şengüler talks about a child walking hand in hand with his father to the Yenikapı Mevlevihanesi (dervish lodge), listening to the women's prayers at the nearby Merkez Efendi Camii (mosque) -- a curious, talkative child whose gaze has wrinkled over the years but whose eyes sparkle with the same intensity. Şengüler speaks about himself, his love for his country, his culture and his art gallery, Les Arts Turcs. A meeting point and a state of mind is how he describes the place. The room is lined with shelves; the shelves are loaded with books, crafts, clothes, jewelry and CDs. Şengüler stands up and heads to the stereo system. The room suddenly fills with the relaxing sound of Sufi music. "Les Arts Turcs was founded some 10 yeas ago by a collection of painters, photographers, artists, singers, journalists, professional guides and entrepreneurs," Şengüler says, sipping his tea and weighing his words. "We welcome travelers from across the globe. We speak, we sit and we explore routes of communication between cultures that rarely communicate." Şengüler's CD collection is a testimony of that state of mind. Armenian music meets Gypsy music, Jewish music and folk music from the four corners of Turkey. "The fact is that there are gaps -- artistic and cultural gaps -- that need to be filled, and Turkish culture deserves that kind of effort," says Şengüler, who envisions his gallery as an international cultural center. "We help foreigners from America, France, India, Korea … appreciate ancient and modern Turkey. We have friends from every hemisphere -- artists, adventurers, intellectuals -- and greet them all with the same eagerness that they show to discover this land and its people." At the service of travelers Şengüler laments about those tourist groups who get out of their buses, head into the Blue Mosque and the Hagia Sophia and out again with the feeling that they know İstanbul and understand the locals. "Here we welcome travelers, people who strive to get in touch with local people and culture, to share meals and talks with Turks whenever they can. That is also the difference between Les Arts Turcs and industrial tourism." Les Arts Turcs gathers some 40 permanent members and hundreds of supporters -- local and international artists, journalists, writers, painters, photographers, professional guides and others. What started as a private art gallery now offers an introduction to the whirling dervish ceremony and the Sufi community in Turkey as well as courses in painting, henna, paper-marbling and calligraphy (along with a permanent exhibition of paintings, statuettes and art at the Sultanahmet address). Les Arts Turcs recently opened a second gallery and a travel agency near the Topkapı Palace and prides itself on appearing in many travel guides. "Look around! Art and history are everywhere," exclaims Şengüler, his gaze now overlooking the streets of Sultanahmet, which vibrate three stories below his gallery. "İstanbul is a small door between the West and the East and people often start from there to discover the side they don't know. I advise those travelers to read a lot beforehand, to watch documentaries and movies from or about Turks. … But it is hard to make a living from culture." A rebel with a cause Şengüler says he welcomes and offers tea to two groups of people. The first are travelers who heard about Les Arts Turcs and visit the gallery -- occasionally buying some objects on display -- and then return home. "The second are intellectuals who conduct specific research on Turkey. For example, the French magazine Elle was looking for female whirling dervishes and we helped them find some. My passion is to put people in touch. When I started, some people told me I was crazy. As it turned out, I was not. The phone keeps ringing here." Şengüler, who says he feels like a rebel with a cause, masters five languages and has been working in the tourist industry since a young age. Turkey sees itself as European, he agrees, but Turks are increasingly protective of their own identity. "I speak foreign languages, I travel a lot. But I have an identity and I love my country, my city. CNN Türk, Sky Türk, Kola Türk, … I am obviously not the only one who strives to affirm the Turkish identity." Then why did he give his art gallery a French name? "To attract Westerners, especially Americans who feel a strong complex vis-à-vis French culture," Şengüler smiles, assuring us that his strategy has worked hundreds of times. "We are currently preparing for 2010, when Turkey will be the culture capital of Europe. Our plan is to invite foreigners who have been writing about İstanbul -- a movie, a book, a documentary … -- and ask them to write again about Turkey. Those people can be instrumental in raising knowledge and awareness about Turkey abroad." But as much as he appreciates foreigners making the effort to learn about Turkish culture, Şengüler warns against certain trends that have little to do with the original message. "The Internet, an extraordinary revolution, brings more and more people across borders -- physically or mentally. Since Sept. 11, we have received many inquiries from Westerners, particularly Americans, about Sufism and [Muhammed Jelaluddin] Rumi. Sufism has become the Buddhism of the 1990s, a way of achieving inner peace. I don't really welcome a trend that considers Sufism as a therapy or simple meditation." While he looks, thoughtful, through the window of his studio, Şengüler is probably imagining a new "strategy," as he puts it, for İstanbul and for Turkey: new ideas for collaboration, new projects to propose, new contacts to create. He may be thinking about his current research on the hippies, his partnership with painter Ayşe Türemiş or with American illustrator Trici Venola. Or maybe he just hopes that the dozens of tourists, whom he is now observing as they get out of their bus, will stop by his gallery and drink some tea with him.[INFO] How to get there Les Arts Turcs is located in the Sultanahmet district, in front of the Hagia Sophia Museum and the Sultanahmet (Blue) Mosque. The gallery is open every day from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m. Address: Alemdar Mah., İncili Çavuş Sok., No: 37, Kat: 3 Tel.: (212) 527 68 59 or (212) 511 2296 http://www.todayszaman.com/tz-web/detaylar.do?load=detay&link=132850, Some of the Anatolian Dances Karşılama, hora and salma are the names of the dances which are peculiar to Trakya region, European part of Turkey and also popular in Balkans. Trakya dances are performed with the accompany of two drums and two pipes. Zigoş, one of the most famous dances, is usually danced by six couples standing in two rows. They advanced towards and recede from each other with their backs slightly bent. They begin slowly and softly, the movement becomes violent step by step, to be followed later by crouching movements. There are also sideways steps and embracing gestures. Zeybek is one of the most well known dances of Turkey,which is found specifically on the Aerean Coast as a characteristic of Western Turkey. It is danced by just one dancer or by several. However even when it is performed by several people, it keeps its solo character as a result of the heroic style of the dance. All dancers follow the movements of others but at the same time they always test the ground and tune their body to the rhythm. Their other leg is in half bent position. They hold their arms outstretched with elbows as high as the shoulders and snap their fingers. Every zeybek is preceded by a slow, introductory part in which the dancer tries leisurely walking steps. This part looks as if the dancers are testing the ground and tuning their bodies to the rhythm. They first walk with the arms at the side, then at shoulder level. It is a dance of solemn, heroic style. The dancers, also called zaybek or efe, wear short embroidered trousers which permit them to kneel. Zeybek can be found in other regiond of Turkey in different styles, sometimes performed with spoons for example. Bengi is also the dance of this region. It is a group dance, representing unity and solidarity like zeybek. Halay is the most widespread dance all around Anatolia. Nearly every village in most parts of Central Anatolia, Eastern Anatolia and the South has its own halay with its own special tune. Dancers usually place themselves in a line or in a semi circle, holding each other’s hands or shoulders. One dancer acts as their leader. He regulates the steps and directs the figures and sometimes he breaks away from the line and executes solo dances facing the line. There are halays danced by men and women together; however there are halays which are performed by just men or women and they change in manner, style, and figures. Horon is the name of a group of dances performed in Northern Turkey on the Black Sea Coast. These dances are characterised by alert, tense, shivering movements, the trembling of the entire body from head to foot, or sudden sharp kneeling and springing up with a rebound. The inhabitants of this area are mostly fishermen or men connected with the sea, so not doubt a rough sea shapes their movements and rhythms. Kaşık Oyunu (Spoon Dance) is the most popular dance in Central Anatolia. Dancers carry in each hand, a pair of varnished wooden spoons, one of which is inserted between thumb and forefinger and the other between the middle and rng finger- in this position they are clicked like castanets. The dancer treads with very small steps in a confined space while undulating the lower part of the body. Another wellknown spoon dance is from Bolu. The dancers start by saluting the onlookers. This salute consists of crouching, touching their spoonsfirst on the ground then on their chins and then on their foreheads. Then the dancers face eacch other in pairs, they approach, recede, kneel and turn. Bar can be taken as the most remarkable group of dance with about forty variations. They are usually chain dances but there are also several bar for two dancers. The most popular chain variety are the twelve different bar from Erzurum. There are usually five dancers, but there could be many more. A chain bar demands a leader, who stands at the right of the chain. Semah is a quasi-religious social dance of villages belong to nomadic tribes of a sect called Alevite. They were performed in secret indoor meetings called cem before. This dancing, in spite of its spirituel awareness and sacred air usually takes a worldly turn. No doubt these mixed dances have some reference to the suppresion and sublimation of desires. Dancers never hold hands but they face each other and cross them across their chests. The women’s arm movements are more restrained than the men’s, for they never raise their arms higher than their shoulders. They move by pointing the toes with smallfoot movements. There is a sacred place in the hall called çeragtahı where candles are burnt. When a dancer passes this place, he must not turn his back on it, he must face it with his hands crossed on his chest and bow his head. Semahs usually are usually performed in quadrille formation, the dancers facing each other in rows. The dancers shuffle back and forth, breaking through each other counter formation. Semahs usually consist of at least two parts: ağırlama, a slow movement in which men and women mirror each other’s hand and arm movements, and yeldirme, a quick movement in which whirling is a striking feature. There are also hand clappings. Many semahs bear a close resemblance to the folk dances of the same region which is Central and Eastern Asia. Caucassian dances group is one of the most spectacular dances of Anatolia. As many ethnic group, Caucasian people live and keep their original culture in harmony with all Anatolia. They imitate the natural life in their homeland, tell their stories, love, legends, wars and daily life with their dance with the accompany of their traditional musical instruments named as şık'epşıne(stringed), pondur(accordion-like), doli(percussive), kamalıpşıne(wind). Men are mostly proud and heroic, women are mostly delicate and laydlike. They dance as a group, in couples or solo.


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